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A few of our plants that are especially useful in permaculture systems, perennial food forests, soil building or for bio-accumulation of nutrients.
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Common Milkweed - Annapolis Seeds - Nova Scotia Canada
Common Milkweed (out of stock)

(Asclepias syriaca) Help feed hungry monarchs! Milkweed is the only food source for Monarch butterfly caterpillars, which are in decline partially due to a lack of food along their migration route. The monoculture farming that's now ubiquitous across North America often doesn't leave much room for the wild spaces both milkweed and monarchs need to make their living. Every summer we see a few dozen monarch butterflies in our milkweed patch. Lets plant a monarch garden in every neighbourhood!

3'-4' perennial plants, with fragrant clusters of flowers loved by bees, followed by green seed pods (which are edible when young). Plants spread with rhizomes.

50+ seeds

-Grown by Annapolis Seeds

Keep in mind, this is the native but potentially invasive Common Milkweed, so plant it in a corner it can go wild without being in the way. For a "better behaved" species that won't take over your whole flower garden, I'd suggest Swamp Milkweed
.


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Elecampane - Annapolis Seeds - Nova Scotia Canada
Elecampane
Price: $3.50

Inula helenium - Elecampane is a powerful herb as well as a very useful permaculture plant. The huge flat leaves are green on top and velvet underneath. A perennial which blossoms with a six foot spike of small, sunflower-like blossoms starting in it's second year. Roots are harvested beginning at the end of their second year. It's valuable in permaculture systems as a dynamic accumulator, drawing up nutrients from deep in the sub-soil and bringing them to the surface when the plants die back and decompose in Autumn.

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Dyer's Woad
Dyer's Woad
Price: $3.50

Ivatis tinctoria - Biennial herb with a long history of use as a blue dye. At one point woad was the major source of blue dye in Europe, but was mostly replaced by imported Indigo, and later on by synthetics. Extremely easy to grow, the plants are leafy and green in their first year and bear huge clusters of bright yellow flowers in their second. Can self-sow, and is considered invasive in some places, although I've never observed it self-seeding on our farm. A bee favourite. Several hundred seeds


Grown by Annapolis Seeds
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Phacelia - Annapolis Seeds
Phacelia
Price: $3.50

Phacelia tanacetifolia - aka Bee’s Friend. I've never seen a plant attract bees quite like Phacelia can. Sometimes planted en masse for a honey bee forage. A popular cover crop in Europe. Lacy foliage and lavender coloured blooms. Planted together, it will form a waist high annual hedge.


-Grown by Annapolis Seeds
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Stinging Nettle - Annapolis Seeds
Stinging Nettle
Price: $3.50

Urtica dioica - One of my favourite wild edibles! Few things are as good as feasting on steamed nettles in spring, after a long winter with scarce fresh greens. I like to cut the leafy young tops at about 6 inches high, they're delicious steamed like spinach or pureed into a soup. Light cooking will deactivate the barbs, making them stingless. They also make delicious herbal tea, either fresh or dried.

Native to Eurasia, and naturalized in North America. Considered a weed in some places, although here in Atlantic Canada it's uncommon to find growing wild. They like growing in moist sites, with either full sun or partial shade. They slowly spread through their roots, and can naturalize in meadows or open woodlands. Several hundred seeds

-Harvested in Nictaux, NS by Annapolis Seeds
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